Category Archives: Cruises

Survey with Passion

 by Huang Lei

OSNAP 9: R/V Pelagia (EAST Leg 2)

My pleasure to join the OSNAP cruise on Pelagia, to meet kind friends from Europe and America who devote themselves to marine career, to experience series of interesting survey. Along with the days on sailing, it’s not only the difference in culture and tradition but also their passion on oceanology with heart that shocks me. In spite of the same survey to sail in Pacific, there seems to be something lost as pursued years ago, the curiosity to explore the uncertainty.

At occasional glimpse on the patience to ADCP of Dave,  the worry about the calculation on Julian Days of Laura, the preciseness on CTD from Ruud and Karel, and the excitement with photo of Pluto buy tramadol online from NASA in Maarten, I can feel the deep charm of scientific spirit, which roots on the sweat spilled on the way to pursuit for truth. It cannot be measured with material things unless the Tao in Chinese tradition. Road is so long coming that I will seek to search with my will unbending.

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By Huang Lei on Pelagia

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Narrow words could be recognized as curved on the cloudy screen

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Slim letters spread with wind like mails

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Soft waves in the sunshine blinked

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All these would make no disturbance to my mind unless the northern breeze blew over my grey temples.

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Welcome to Qingdao. Please email to me as you occasionally pass by Qingdao.

Email?hfhhfh241@sina.com hfhhfh241@2980.com

Address: Ocean University of China ?????????238??????? ??

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Final post from the Thassala

By Camille Lique

RREX cruise: R/V Thassala

It is been a week since we came back to dry land. After 35 days at sea, everyone was pretty excited to be back at home!

Looking back at what we achieved, the cruise is already a big success, as we managed to carry out all that was initially planned (and even more). It is now time to look more in detail at the data from the 131 CTD casts, the ADCP transects, and the 58 microstructure profiles. Some of the autonomous instruments we deployed during the cruise should (obviously) send observation for the next few years. A twin cruise should happen in 2017 to recover the 9 moorings we left at sea, and gather more in situ observations. Now it is time to start a new phase of the work, as it will probably take months (if not years), to dissect all the data and unravel all the physical processes we have capture in our the set of observations. This should allow us to provide a comprehensive description of the oceanic conditions in this region, and to better describe, quantify and understand all the complex oceanic features encompassed in the dataset.

At a time when we are all getting back to a more normal life, we also know that this experience at sea will remain in our mind for a long time.

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OSNAP East Leg 2 Underway

By Laura de Steur

OSNAP 9: R/V Pelagia (EAST Leg 2)

: Leg 2 will service 12 moorings: G: the Dutch moorings, D2: British moorings, C: German mooring,  L: Dutch profiling mooring, and E1 and E3: RAFOS float deployments

Leg 2 will service 12 moorings: G: the Dutch moorings, D2: British moorings, C: German mooring, L: Dutch profiling mooring, and E1 and E3: RAFOS float deployments

After a bright sunny day of loading and getting ready on RV Pelagia in the port of Reykjavik, we are well underway to retrieve and redeploy 12 tall oceanic moorings in the Irminger Sea (marked with leg 2 in the red box). The successful team from leg 1 arrived in Reykjavik two days earlier than planned and they handed the ship over to us. The moorings we will be recovering have been collecting continuous measurements of temperature, salinity and currents in the Irminger Sea for a whole year. We expect to arrive to the first mooring site on the Reykjanes Ridge on Friday morning to start recovery and read the first data sets from the instruments. After that we head west to collect all 5 moorings on the Reykjanes Ridge and traverse back again whilst doing CTD measurements and float deployments on the ridge after which the moorings will be deployed again for another year.

The mooring data collected during this cruise contributes to both the OSNAP and NACLIM programs. We have an international team with 7 different nationalities. Some of us have to get used to being at sea while others appear to have no problem to focus on computer screens… the weather so far is great though we are expecting more wind and waves tomorrow.

Stay tuned for updates!

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Loading of RV Pelagia in Reyjavik

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First time at sea: lessons learned

by Casimir De Lavergne

RREX cruise: R/V Thassala

On June 6, 2015, I embarked with the RREX team on R/V Thalassa for a five-week journey across the subpolar North Atlantic. The ultimate objective of the cruise is to fathom the mysteriCasimir De Lavergnees of ocean flows near the Reykjanes Ridge, a submarine mountain chain connecting the southern tip of Iceland to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge further south. Though achieving this goal will remain a continuing challenge for the months and years to come, some distance has certainly been covered. A huge amount of information on local currents, turbulence and water properties has already been collected, and much more data is to be recovered from the vast array of autonomous instruments that have been deployed. Promisingly, preliminary (real time!) analysis of the data already shows some intriguing and unexpected features. The next step will be to build an understanding of the underlying physics by comparing the new data to historical observations, laboratory experiments and theory.

But for a student living its first embarkation, such a cruise holds many more lessons than those coming from the data itself. Now barely ten days away from the ship’s docking in Brest, let us venture a brief assessment.

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Which day is today?

By Camille Lique

If you ask anyone on the ship “which day is today?”, it will likely take a few seconds before you get an answer. It might actually even require a few try before you get the right answer. Time flies a bit differently at sea.

As we are working 7 day a week and we are doing very repetitive tasks, each day looks a lot like the previous and the following ones, and we quickly lose track of the day and date (the only reason I still know the date is because we need to fill a form with the date each time we start a new CTD station!). It’s been only 3 weeks since we left Brest. Yet, as most of the days are so similar, we have the feeling that we’ve been there for months! The fact that we hardly see any sign of a night (or just any darkness) does not help either. Have you seen the movie “Groundhog Day”? I’m pretty sure the director was on a scientific cruise when he thought of the story…

On the other hand, as most of us are working in shifts, we all end up trying to optimize the time we can sleep, stay in the canteen during the meals, or do something else before we run to start our shift. Moreover, no one wants to miss one of the fixed-time lunches or dinners. Hence, although I’m not carrying a watch, I can probably http://buyultramnow.com give you the time within a five-minute error (you can find large clocks in some strategic spots all around the ship).

Additionally, instead of the date, everyone on board can give you within a second how many days are left before 1) we start the travel back (and thus when we’ll stop working – next Sunday evening!) and 2) before we reach Brest and can go back home.

Well, all of that is true, but one day a week. On a Sunday, if you ask anyone on the ship “Which day is today?”, you’ll get the right answer within a second, and you will likely see a smile growing on the face of the person you’ve just asked. This is owed to two persons: our cooks (what would you expect on a French cruise?!). Sunday morning starts with pastries. And chocolates! They also dedicate special attention to Sunday lunch, which usually ends up with a special (and quite fabulous) cake (if not several!).
It does not take much to keep us happy!

Philippe and Jean-François

Philippe and Jean-François in the kitchen -Ifremer/RREX/C. Lagadec

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RREX Cruise Observations

By Camille Lique

First, if you want to know where we are right now, have a look here.

We are now running measurements at full speed. This means that we work in shift and observations are carried out continuously, 24 hours a day. Part of the observations during the RREX campaign is done during CTD operations (around 120 stations are planned in total). This means that we stop every so often to lower the CTD package from the surface to the bottom of the sea, which carries a few sensors measuring the temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen content. Additionally, the CTD package carries bottles, which we close at different levels. Once the package is back at the surface, we sample water in the different bottles, allowing us to calibrate the sensors and to carry more measurements (pH, levels of nutrients). Last the CTD package is used to measure the ocean current profile at each station, using the ADCP mounted on the CTD package.

The CTD package, Ifremer/Ovide

The CTD package, Ifremer/Ovide

In addition to the CTD operations, we will deploy a bunch of Argo buy strattera online floats during the RREX cruise. An Argo float is an autonomous drifting profiler, which is programed to drift freely around 1000m and every 10 days, change its buoyancy to dive to a depth of 2000m and then go the surface, measuring a temperature and salinity profile. The float then transmits its data to a data center via a satellite, and starts a new 10-days cycle.

Argo floats on board of the Thalassa, ready to be deployed. -Ifremer/RREX/V. Thierry

Argo floats on board of the Thalassa, ready to be deployed. -Ifremer/RREX/V. Thierry

As of today, around 3000 Argo float are drifting in the ocean (a float lasts around 4 years). Their data is used by the meteorology and oceanography forecast centers, as well as by researcher in order to quantify and study the ocean warming and its possible consequences for the sea level rise.

A few days ago, deployed a special Argo float: A Deep-Arvor. This Argo float is indeed able to reach depth as deep as 4000m. It is only the fifth of this kind ever deployed, and the float has already transmitted its first observations!

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RREX 2015 cruise underway

By Camille Lique

It has been almost a week since the RREX 2015 cruise started. After loading all our scientific equipment onto the N/O Thalassa, and finding a place for everything, we headed out from Brest (France) on Saturday, June 6th.

Ifremer/RREX/V. Thierry N/O Thalassa is ready for the departure

thalassa_depart

C. Maes Departure of the N/O Thalassa seen from Brest

The first few days were fairly quiet. It takes almost five days to reach the Reykjanes ridge (South of Iceland) where we will do most of our measurements. It’s a http://buyantibioticsonline.org good thing as it gave us time to get use to being at sea again and get back on our feet. The journey has been busy with a first test CTD station to train everyone to the specific tasks they will perform, and to test all the instruments (and of course to fix some of them!).

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Ifremer/RREX/V. Thierry Sampling during the First test CTD station

By Wednesday night we had reached the first CTD station for the RREX cruise (blue dot on the map) and everyone was ready to start working during their night and day work shifts. More about the measurements next time!

Ifremer/RREX/V. Thierry N/O Thalassa is ready for the departure

Ifremer/RREX/V. Thierry Map of planned stations for the RREX cruise

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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